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The word "kimono", which literally means a "thing to wear" (ki "wear" and mono "thing"), has been used to name the Japanese's full-length robes.
Kimonos are T-shaped, straight-lined robes with long wide sleeves. Kimonos are wrapped around the body, always with the left front over the right. It is not unusual for a Japanese person who wears a kimono for the first time to wear the fronts the wrong way round, and it is also not unusual for an older, more informed Japanese person to try to switch their kimono fronts around, horrified that the young person is dressed as a corpse. That is because the positions of the two fronts are switched when dressing the dead for burial. In addition to the rule “left over right”, kimonos are secured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back. Kimonos are generally worn with traditional footwear.
Today, kimonos are most often worn by women and men on very special and formal occasions such as weddings or ceremonies. A few older women and even fewer men still wear the kimono on a daily basis. Professional sumo wrestlers are often seen in the kimono because they are required to dress traditionally whenever appearing in public.

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The word "kimono", which literally means a "thing to wear" (ki "wear" and mono "thing"), has been used to name the Japanese's full-length robes.

Kimonos are T-shaped, straight-lined robes with long wide sleeves. Kimonos are wrapped around the body, always with the left front over the right. It is not unusual for a Japanese person who wears a kimono for the first time to wear the fronts the wrong way round, and it is also not unusual for an older, more informed Japanese person to try to switch their kimono fronts around, horrified that the young person is dressed as a corpse. That is because the positions of the two fronts are switched when dressing the dead for burial. In addition to the rule “left over right”, kimonos are secured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back. Kimonos are generally worn with traditional footwear.

Today, kimonos are most often worn by women and men on very special and formal occasions such as weddings or ceremonies. A few older women and even fewer men still wear the kimono on a daily basis. Professional sumo wrestlers are often seen in the kimono because they are required to dress traditionally whenever appearing in public.

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